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Behold Your God - Part 8

"The Mercy Of God"

by David Legge | Copyright © 2001 | All Rights Reserved | www.preachtheword.com

'Preach The Word'
On that day when the Lord Jesus Christ bursts the clouds, and He takes us home to be with Himself - His blood-bought church that He has redeemed - and when we sit up there in heaven, and we sing the praises of Him who died, and we worship the Lord around that great throne, I believe that the sweetest song that we will have is the song of God's mercy

Now, we're turning in our Bibles first of all to Psalm 136, Psalm 136 - and then we're turning to Ephesians chapter 2 after that, if you want to find that portion of scripture. This is the [eighth] study in our series on Lord's Day mornings of the character and the attributes of our God, and we're looking this morning at the mercy of our God - the great mercy of God Almighty. The Psalm that I have asked you to turn to is a very well-known Psalm, simply because the mercy of God is put through it like a thread - after every verse you have this little group of words: 'For His mercy endureth forever'. Now, we'll not take time to read the whole of the Psalm, but let's read the first few verses to get the idea of the Psalmist behind this theme.

Verse 1: "O give thanks unto the Lord; for he is good: for his mercy endureth for ever. O give thanks unto the God of gods: for his mercy endureth for ever. O give thanks to the Lord of lords: for his mercy endureth for ever. To him who alone doeth great wonders: for his mercy endureth for ever. To him that by wisdom made the heavens: for his mercy endureth for ever. To him that stretched out the earth above the waters: for his mercy endureth for ever. To him that made great lights: for his mercy endureth for ever: The sun to rule by day: for his mercy endureth for ever: The moon and stars to rule by night: for his mercy endureth for ever. To him that smote Egypt in their firstborn: for his mercy endureth for ever: And brought out Israel from among them: for his mercy endureth for ever: With a strong hand, and with a stretched out arm: for his mercy endureth for ever. To him which divided the Red sea into parts: for his mercy endureth for ever: And made Israel to pass through the midst of it: for his mercy endureth for ever: But overthrew Pharaoh and his host in the Red sea: for his mercy endureth for ever".

Isn't that beautiful? Ephesians chapter 2 this time, Ephesians chapter 2 - and we have studied this passage of scripture in quite a lot of depth on a Monday night, but I just want to cast your eyes down to one particular verse and phrase within this passage. We'll read from verse 1: "And you", Paul says, "hath he quickened, who were dead in trespasses and sins: Wherein in time past ye walked according to the course of this world, according to the prince of the power of the air, the spirit that now worketh in the children of disobedience: Among whom also we all had our conversation in times past in the lusts of our flesh, fulfilling the desires of the flesh and of the mind; and were by nature the children of wrath, even as others. But God, who is rich in mercy, for his great love wherewith he loved us, Even when we were dead in sins, hath quickened us together with Christ, (by grace ye are saved)".

On that day when the Lord Jesus Christ bursts the clouds, and He takes us home to be with Himself - His blood-bought church that He has redeemed - and when we sit up there in heaven, and we sing the praises of Him who died, and we worship the Lord around that great throne, I believe that the sweetest song that we will have is the song of God's mercy. 'His mercy endureth for ever', 'kheh lay o-lawm hastoh' (sp?) - that's it in the Hebrew, right throughout that Hebrew song of praise: 'His mercy endureth for ever, His mercy endureth for ever'. I don't know whether this will happen or not, but as we sit in heaven, and as we have a moment to meditate and to ponder how we've got there - will it not be God's mercy? Will it not be the song of praise for what God has done, in pitying us and in having compassion on us, that will well from our being? When we think to ourselves: 'What right have I to be here?', and we think to ourselves of the cosmic rebellion that we all took part in by our sinful nature - when Lucifer was cast from heaven and the third of his fallen angels came down, and when Satan entered into the garden, that subtle serpent, and man fell, and death came upon all men, and all are concluded under sin and under death - and when we think that we were party to the de-throning of the sovereign God of heaven...yet we are in heaven with Him.

We who, Paul says, were dead in trespasses and in sins. We who in a time past walked according to the course of this world, according to the prince of the power of the air, the spirit that now worketh in the children of disobedience - among whom we all had our way of life in times past in the lusts of the flesh, fulfilling the desires of the flesh and of the mind; and were by nature children of wrath! Those who deserved the pangs of hell will be enjoying the pleasures of heaven. Those whose prospect was the excruciating torments of the lake of Gehenna, is now the ecstasy of eternal glory with God and His Christ for ever - all of mercy! Isn't that wonderful? Is it any wonder that three times in Psalm 136, the Psalmist invites God's people to thank the Lord for His mercy. That's what it begins with, look at it: 'O give thanks unto the Lord; for he is good: for his mercy endureth for ever'.

We believe that this Psalm was, perhaps, sung by two choirs - perhaps one of the choirs was a choir made up of priests and Levites, and the other individual singing was the high priest. You can just imagine the high priest singing out: 'O give thanks unto the Lord; for he is good', and that great congregation of priests replying back: 'His mercy endureth for ever'. Do you think we could do that this morning? I'll say the first bit, you say the second: [Pastor Legge:] O give thanks unto the Lord; for he is good...[Congregation:] for his mercy endureth for ever - powerful! Can you imagine it? How it would have sunk into the hearts of those sinners looking to a slain lamb, how God - who delivered them from Egypt - was merciful, and His mercy endured for ever! And this Psalm, like an 'interleaved' Bible, was teaching these Israelites to interleaf all things in life with the thought of the glorious mercy of God. Is it any wonder that Joseph Adison said this, as he penned his hymn:

'When all Thy mercies, O my God,
My rising soul surveys.
Transported with the view I am lost
In wonder, love and praise'.

What is the mercy of God? I want us to look at that first of all, to ask the question: what is this mercy? Secondly: where can the mercy of God be witnessed? And thirdly: what difference does God's mercy make to you? So first of all let's look at what the mercy of God is. If you were to define mercy, it simply is infinite, inexhaustible energy of God. It is His infinite, inexhaustible energy to be compassionate! His mercy is the manifestation of His love. We thought of His love a fortnight ago, well, this is how His love operates - this is the mechanism, the arm of God's love is His mercy. It is the result and the effect of His goodness - the Lord is good: '...for he is good: for his mercy endureth for ever'. His mercy is pity, He looks upon us and He pities us. His mercy is when He looks upon sin and He pities the guilt and the result of it, and He relieves!

God, in the Bible, in His great revelation of who He is, is represented more in mercy than in anger. Definitely the mercy of God is deeper than the depths of His wrath and His indignation, for He loves to be merciful! He is more inclined to mercy than He is to wrath

You find God's mercy in the Old Testament, you find it in the New Testament - in fact, you find God's mercy four times more in the Old Testament than you do within the New Testament. We must banish the thought that the God of Israel in the Old Testament is an angry God of justice, a God of judgement; but the God in the New Testament, for the church, is full of mercy and grace and love. But our God - surely we've learnt this in the weeks that have gone by - our God is an unchangeable God! He is the same yesterday, and today, and forever! Although the New Testament, of course, is the full revelation of our God - and we don't know Him in all His mercy until we come into the New Testament - nevertheless God has always been, and always will be, a God of mercy...for that's what He is in Himself, mercy.

1 Kings 3:6, we read that God's mercy is great. Psalm 86, we read that He is plenteous in mercy. Psalm 103, from everlasting to everlasting is His mercy. Luke 1, He is tender in mercy. He is abundant, overflowing, 1 Peter says. Ephesians, that we read says: 'But God, who is rich in mercy'. And Psalm 103:11 says, for as high as the heaven is above the earth - that's God's mercy! Immeasurable, unlimited, eternal, stretching from age to age. It is the mercy of God that is the tugboat that draws the sinner's foundering vessel into the arms of God. It's what saves the sinner, the mercy of God. It is what draws him to a Saviour, that's what he says: 'The Lord is merciful and gracious...long-suffering...abundant in goodness'. In fact, when you go into the book of the Revelation - and indeed throughout the Bible - God is pictured and represented as being a great King, sitting on a throne with a rainbow about His throne. The rainbow, of course, is a representation of the mercy of our God.

Have you ever thought about that? That God, in the Bible, in His great revelation of who He is, is represented more in mercy than in anger. Definitely the mercy of God is deeper than the depths of His wrath and His indignation, for He loves to be merciful! He is more inclined to mercy than He is to wrath. It was Watson, the old puritan, said: 'For God, acts of severity are rather forced from Him, He does not afflict willingly'. It's like the bee in the summertime, busily going from one flower and its pollen to another - and what is it doing? It is [making] honey because it naturally does that, and it goes from a flower to a flower and eventually it goes home, and there in the honeycomb it makes its honey - it's natural to it. But then when a young child happens to annoy it, it stings! It doesn't sting naturally, but only when it is provoked - and that's like our God. God is naturally merciful, but when God is provoked He will be angered, but He loves mercy rather than anger!

Mercy is said to be the work of God's right-hand - most of us are right-handed, and that's simply what the word of God means: that it is the thing that God likes to use the most, His mercy. He is more used to His right hand, He is more used to exercising mercy. God does not, in a sense, want to inflict punishment - indeed, in Isaiah 28, it is described as 'His strange work', it is strange for God to punish people, He is slow to anger. When He punishes a nation in the book of Isaiah it is said of Him that He: 'hired a razor to shave them' - imagine God hiring anything! You would think God wouldn't need to hire anything or borrow anything! But in Isaiah it says He hires a razor to shave them in anger and indignation - as if it's not His own, He has to borrow this part to do an act of wrath!

Just think for a moment: imagine how God would be if He had no mercy. Imagine what the holiness of God would be if there was no mercy. Imagine what the justice of God would be if mercy had no part in it. But the mercy of God, just like that arch that we've been talking about, it overarches all His other attributes - and indeed, let me say this, that the mercy of God sweetens His other attributes. It's like old Moses, you remember, they came - the children of Israel - to the waters of bitterness and they couldn't drink from it, and what did Moses do? He cast the tree into the waters and made them sweet - and that is what the mercy of God is like to all His other attributes, it makes them sweet. It is one of His glories, it is one of the jewels in His crown - and in the very first week, as we were thinking about what it is to think right thoughts about God and contemplate God, we looked at Exodus chapter 33 and we looked at that wonderful encounter of communion of Moses with his God. He talked with God as a man talks with his friend, and we saw that in his brokenness, in his thirst after God - one who knew God in a way, perhaps, face-to-face that we will not know Him until we get to glory - he was able even to pray: 'Lord, show me Thy glory'! And the answer that was given back to Moses was this: 'I will make all my goodness pass before thee, and I will show thee mercy'.

That's what God wants to show to the world. In fact, even God's enemies receive mercy, it's like the dew that falls on the thistle as well as the rose. God's mercy - the sun shines on the righteous and on the unrighteous, and not just those that dwell in the presence of God. You remember Pharaoh, we read about him in this Psalm, as he was crossing the Red Sea pursuing, as a predator, after the Israelites - Pharaoh's head was crowned, and God had shown him mercy to put that crown upon his head. Even though his heart was hardened, his head was crowned! For the Lord, the word of God says, is good to all; the Lord is merciful to all.

That mercy is not shown to everyone! No, it's not. It's not shown to men who are rebellious, it's not shown to young people who are proud and say: 'I don't need the mercy of God'

Now let's make a digression for a moment, because it's important to understand the difference between God's grace and God's mercy. At a quick glance you would imagine that there's very little difference between the two, but I want you to think of the angels for a moment. If you think of eternity past, and you think of heaven - no creatures in the sense of men and women like you and I, but the angels are in the presence of God. And let me say that the angels experienced the grace of God, they experienced the goodness of God, for they were dwelling in His presence and that is the grace of God - to dwell in His presence. They were serving God, and no creature - even an angel - can serve God without His grace. The very fact that two-thirds of the angels didn't fall shows that God's grace preserved them, God's grace pulled them back from their sin and their rebellion. Yet in all of their grace they never, ever knew the mercy of God.

If you think about it, the fallen angels, in 2 Peter 2 and 4 it says this: 'God spared not the angels that sinned, but cast them down to hell, and delivered them into chains of darkness, to be reserved unto judgment'. Those angels that fell from heaven, they never knew the mercy of God! And even the ones that didn't fall from heaven never knew it either, because you have to sin to know it. But it's not just sinning, it's sinning and having the grace of God restore you in mercy - and only a human being can know that. You see, what mercy is is simply this: human misery, human degradation, human depravity, human deadness in their trespasses and in their sins - and a God taking pity and compassion, and love and goodness, and coming down to relieve that pain! That's mercy, and what mercy it is!

Secondly: where can the mercy of God be witnessed? There are several places that it can be witnessed, and the first is this: in all life, all life. The puritans, who were right in a lot of things, distinguished in their theology between the general mercy of God and the special mercy of God. 'The general mercy of God', they said, 'is to all creation' - as the Psalmist says, 145: 'The Lord is good to all: and his tender mercies are over all his works'. Even the brute beasts, the animals in the field, even the very sparrow that falls - the Lord Jesus Christ says - God has mercy upon them and pities them. 'The earth', the Psalmist says, 'is full of thy mercy' - that is the general mercy of God, shown to all. Then there is the special mercy of God, and that is shown to those whom He saves. Those who have faith in Him, God lavishes His mercy upon them. He's described - a child that trusts in God - as being a vessel of mercy. God has restored him from judgement and justice. The child that has known the mercy of God has been saved that God may make known the riches of His glory to them.

You know it in regeneration, I hope to God it's happened to you! Like Paul on that road to Damascus, he had no thought of God - that's what he says! He was in ignorance of who the Christ was, and he's walking down that road going to kill Christians, going as the enemy of God - and out of the blue God arrests him! Boy, is that mercy. And God lets the scales fall from off his eyes, to see his sin - that is the special mercy of God, to be pitied, to be rescued from judgement and hell. And let me say this today: that mercy is not shown to everyone! No, it's not. It's not shown to men who are rebellious, it's not shown to young people who are proud and say: 'I don't need the mercy of God' - for the word of God says in Luke 1: 'His mercy is on them that fear Him'! If you don't fear God, you'll know nothing of the mercy of God. Listen sinners, Romans says: 'Not by works of righteousness, but according to His mercy He saved us. So then it is not of him that runneth, but of God that showeth mercy'! Do you know the mercy of God? If you don't know the mercy of God my friend, it's because of your proud, bold, sinful, deep dyed, damnable heart!

This special mercy, God lavishes it upon whom He wills who has faith in Him. This is a sovereign thing, this is the God of all gods who says in Romans 9: 'For he said to Moses, I will have mercy on whom I will have mercy, and I will have compassion on whom I will have compassion...Therefore hath he mercy on whom he will have mercy, and whom he will he hardeneth'. This is a baffling thing, that the Lord harden men against Him? Now don't be confused about this, because men are very responsible for every single thing that they do - and let me say that God doesn't make a man evil, God doesn't make a man reject Him, that is given to your own individual choice. But let me say this: when God Almighty, the sovereign God decides to withdraw His influence in grace from your heart, your heart will harden! Oh, that men would know this! That if God decided to take His gracious sunshine away from your heart, He wouldn't need to harden your heart...it would harden itself. It's like when the sun sets, the temperature goes down and the frost comes across the road. You wouldn't dream of saying that, because the sun has gone out, that the sun hardened the ground. Did the sun harden the ground? No! But that gracious influence of God, that is why we say to you today - in the light of the Gospel - Pharaoh hardened his own heart! Because God took His grace away from him, his heart became hard - and God says to you today: if you hear His voice, harden not your heart! How terrible that on that judgement day, if you should stand before the Lord Jesus Christ, and it would be the mercy of God that would indict you! Imagine that! The very goodness of God would damn your soul, because you rejected it!

If you hear His voice, harden not your heart! How terrible that on that judgement day, if you should stand before the Lord Jesus Christ, and it would be the mercy of God that would indict you! Imagine that! The very goodness of God would damn your soul, because you rejected it!

His mercy is in all life. Secondly, His mercy is in our circumstances. Now, you believers here today, this is for you. Psalm 103 says: 'For as the heaven is high above the earth, so great is [God's] mercy toward them that fear him'. 'To us', Corinthians says, 'He is the Father of mercies' - that means this, believer: everything in your life, every circumstance, everything that has happened to you, there is the mercy of God in it! It is of the Lord's mercies that we are not consumed, is it not? Indeed, I'm led to believe that there is a place in Sicily, and it's situated in such a geographical place that the sun never, ever is out of sight, never. That's like the mercy of God in our believing lives, God's mercy is never absent, God's mercy is never invisible, it's never empty - and what a humbling thing, that even in our trials and our tribulations the God of mercy has His hand in it.

Thirdly: you can witness the mercy of God in redemption. Imagine this: the mercy of God without the atonement of Christ. Can you imagine that? I can't. The mercy of God is impotent without Calvary. It has no power, it's no good to you - and that means this: that sinners can't cast themselves on the mercy of God and reject Calvary! Oh, there's so many doing that! 'I'll wait till I get to heaven and maybe God will let me in. It doesn't matter what religion I am, we all worship the one true God, and if He's a God of love and mercy He'll let me in' - God has no mercy apart from Calvary! For it was the mercy seat. In the Old Testament, the Ark of the covenant - the lid that was on top of it - wasn't it called the mercy seat? And that was the God-appointed place where Moses would commune with God, that's the place where the high priest, once a year on the Day of the Atonement, would sprinkle the blood, that was the place associated with covering and the removal of sin - through the blood God has mercy! The Lord Jesus Christ is His mercy seat. You see, Calvary is where God meets the sinner and extends mercy. Wasn't it said, prophetically, of our Lord Jesus Christ in the Psalms, 85: 'Mercy and truth are met together; righteousness and peace have kissed each other' - the mercy seat! Have you been there? Have you been to Calvary? Oh, the hymn writers have put it well in all their different ways. One modern one puts it like this:

'Come worship at His feet,
Where wrath and mercy meet
And a guilty world is washed in love's pure stream'.

We were singing it this morning:

'Great is the Gospel of our glorious God,
Where mercy met the anger of God's rod.
A penalty was paid and pardon bought,
And sinners lost at last to Him were brought'.

Many a morning when round the table we've sung:

'Jehovah bade His sword awake,
Oh, Christ it woke 'gainst Thee.
Thy blood the fiery sword must slake,
Thy heart its sheath must be'.

Why? Because of the mercy of God.

It's seen in all, it's seen in your circumstances, it's seen redemption - and let me say this very soberingly, and this has shook me as I've been studying this: God's mercy is witnessed in hell. That's a strange thing, isn't it? Even, think of it, when the lost are cast into the lake of fire it is an act of God's mercy. It's not from your point of view, if you're not saved - but from heaven's point of view it is. You see, hell is the casting out forever of all sin. Forever! And is it not the mercy of God that in the new Jerusalem we read that there shall in no wise enter into it anything that defileth, neither whatsoever worketh abomination? Can you imagine walking down the streets of gold and hearing blasphemy in one ear, and hearing the name of the Lord thy God taken in vain in the other? Can you imagine that? No! The mercy of God is towards the righteous - those who believe - so much that God won't have it, and every sin is damned in hell.

What difference does God's mercy make to you? What difference does it make? First of all, let me say to believers in this meeting, this is the difference: you ought to show mercy

Oh, it's mighty, isn't it? It's awesome to think, as we read in 136, that God overthrew Pharaoh and his hosts in the Red Sea for His mercy endureth forever. How could anybody say the like of that? That's their song of praise! 'God overthrew Pharaoh in the Red Sea, for His mercy endureth forever', for it was the mercy of God. My friend, we read in Revelation 19 - and if you're not saved, you sit up and you listen up! John says: 'I heard a great voice of much people in heaven, saying, Alleluia; Salvation, and glory, and honour, and power, unto the Lord our God: For true and righteous are his judgments: for he hath judged the great whore, which did corrupt the earth with her fornication, and hath avenged the blood of his servants at her hand. And again they said, Alleluia. And her smoke rose up for ever and ever'! That's like saying: 'Praise the Lord, the damned are damned'. Even the mercy of God in the likes of that? Do you know what that tells me? If I was a sinner, without Christ in this meeting, it would tell me of the foolishness of those who believe that God's mercy will see them through the end. 'I'll take a chance. I've lived alright, I haven't done anybody any harm. I go to my church, I try my best, I'm good to my family - God would never cast me into hell! His mercy endures forever!' - that is to forget, my friend, that He's a God of justice, that He's sovereign in His mercy - and if you hear His voice, for God's sake harden not your heart, for God may withdraw His grace and His mercy and you'll be lost! God says: 'I will by no means clear the guilty'. He says: 'The wicked shall be turned into hell, and all the nations that forget God'.

Imagine a man or a woman, and they don't wash themselves, they don't clean their teeth and their teeth are rotten, they don't wash themselves and there are germs crawling over them - all over their hair and everything, under their nails - and they are getting diseased because of it. Do you think God would withhold disease from a man or a woman that lived in that condition? Not on your life! Do you think God will lavish His mercy on a soul that has heaped sin upon its own head? I don't know what kind of a God that is, but it's not our God! Do you know something? You can make God's mercy your enemy. Like sucking poison out of a beautiful flower, you can have a deadly, deadly blow dealt to your soul!

Thirdly: what difference does God's mercy make to you? What difference does it make? First of all, let me say to believers in this meeting, this is the difference: you ought to show mercy. That's what the Lord said in the beatitudes, isn't it? Matthew 5:7: 'Blessed are the merciful: for they shall obtain mercy'. James 2:13: 'For he shall have judgment without mercy, that hath showed no mercy' - if you don't show any mercy in your life, God will judge you without any mercy. Luke 6:36: 'Be ye therefore merciful, as your Father also is merciful' - show mercy one to another!

Secondly: you ought to trust God's mercy. Isn't that right? That's what the Psalmist said: 'I will trust in the mercy of God for ever'. Listen! Will you please think about this: the mercy of God, right now, here and now, is a fountain open - and if you would just let your bucket of faith drop down, you could take a draught, and drink by faith of that well of salvation. If you're not saved, well, listen to me: God's mercy is open for you now - it'll not be open forever, but it's open now! It's open now and the Lord Jesus says, 'whosoever will, let him come and take of the water of life freely'. Imagine going to court and there's a judge there, and the judge is pleading with the person in the dock! Have you ever seen that? I've never seen it! The judge pleading with the person accused? But this is your Judge pleading with you to partake of His mercy. My friend, this is baffling! Imagine the fool that would refuse such a thing! God is saying to you, in His mercy: 'Allow Me to love you, be willing to let Me save you!' - mercy pleases God! But unbelief smothers it, and if you're not a believer here, the bowels of God's compassion are shut up for you, the wounds gaping and the sore of the Saviour that flow forth that medicine for all sin and shame and iniquity are closed over for you. There is no compassion, there is no joy, there is no virtue in the wounded Christ for you! But if you would just believe, if you would just trust in His mercy, like Wesley you'd be able to say:

'Arise my soul, arise.
Shake off thy guilty fears,
The Bleeding Sacrifice
In my behalf appears.

Before the throne my surety stands,
My name is written in His hands.
My God is reconciled,
His pardoning voice I hear,

He owns me for His child,
I can no longer fear.
With confidence I now draw nigh
And Father, Abba Father cry'.

Like another, you could say:

'There is a wideness in God's mercy
Like the wideness of the sea.
There's a kindness in His justice
Which is more than liberty.

There is a welcome for the sinner,
And more graces for the good.
There is a mercy with the Saviour,
There is healing in His blood'.

Will you trust Him? Now come on! Will you? Such great mercy enduring forever! Will you partake of it?

And finally, for every child of God in this place: you ought to obtain mercy. Yes, you can show it, yes, you can trust in it - but you know, we can obtain it. We can go in prayer to God and look at Him - not in robes of justice and robes of wrath, but we can see God clad and arched in a rainbow of mercy. Imagine coming to a God such as that, a God whose mercy is toward us - that should add wings to our prayers, to know that God is so great, God is so mighty yet God is for us. We ought to come boldly before our God, knowing that He is merciful. Like the old puritan said, you wouldn't dream of coming to a fire that was lovely and warm and wondering was there any warmth in it for you - would you? No - it's blatantly obvious, and my Christian friend it should be blatantly obvious to you that if you come to God you will obtain mercy.

There are folk here that aren't saved - imagine not being saved, and in the very midst of the mercy of God! Do you think you're going to get away with that at the throne?

It says of Samuel that on one occasion he took a suckling lamb before God - and every believer in this place, if you could take the Lamb of God in your arms, slain before God, into His presence knowing that it's through that Lamb that you come; if you would come to the throne of grace on His perfect merits and His finished work you would hear this: 'My child, you have not an high priest which cannot be touched with the feelings of your infirmities, but He was in all points tested like as you are - yet without sin. Therefore, My child, come boldly unto the throne grace that [you] may obtain mercy!' - to obtain mercy and find grace to help in time of need.

Let's say it again: [Pastor Legge:] O give thanks unto the Lord; for he is good...[Congregation:] for his mercy endureth for ever - hallelujah!

Now, let's bow our heads together. There are folk here that aren't saved - imagine not being saved, and in the very midst of the mercy of God! Do you think you're going to get away with that at the throne, when the Lord says: 'You were in the Iron Hall on the 7th of January 2001, and I opened up the windows of heaven and poured My mercy upon you and you walked out and refused it'? My friend, it's like the lead that comes out of the mine - when it's taken out of there it's very cold, but when it's put into the fire it's very hot. If you come to Christ now, in the day of salvation, you will know the mercy of God - but if you reject it will be the very thing that will damn your soul. Will you come?

Child of God, things are hard, things have been difficult - but whatever you do, throughout it all don't miss the mercy of God in it, for if we didn't have it we would be consumed - but great is His faithfulness. Rest upon it today, and if you're here broken hearted, reach out by faith to that throne boldly, and obtain mercy that you need.

Father, we thank Thee for such a merciful God, tender, compassionate, loving and good. And oh, Lord, You love and long to lavish Your mercy upon those that You've created - but Lord, Your mercy will never contradict Your justice and Your holiness. I pray today that every soul in this building this morning will be a partaker of the mercy - the special, saving mercy - of Almighty God, and that we all, children of God, may know what it is to boldly come and know the mercy of God to strengthen us in our need. In the name of the Lord Jesus we pray, Amen.

Don't miss Part 9 of 'Behold Your God!': "The Grace Of God"

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Transcribed by:
Andrew Watkins,
Preach The Word.
January 2001
www.preachtheword.com

This sermon was delivered at The Iron Hall Assembly in Belfast, Northern Ireland, by Pastor David Legge. It was transcribed from the eighth tape in his 'Behold Your God' series, titled "The Mercy Of God" - Transcribed by Andrew Watkins, Preach The Word.

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