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"What I Love About The Lord"

by David Legge | Copyright © 2006 | All Rights Reserved | www.preachtheword.com

'Preach The Word'Psalm 18. I don't know if I'll revisit this Psalm to do the remainder of the verses next week, I'll seek the Lord on that one, we may well do that - but I want to at least concentrate on the first 18 or 19 verses of this Psalm this morning.

I want to share with you from David's heart and my own, what I love about the Lord - but do you love him?

Verse 1: "I will love thee, O LORD, my strength. The LORD is my rock, and my fortress, and my deliverer; my God, my strength, in whom I will trust; my buckler, and the horn of my salvation, and my high tower. I will call upon the LORD, who is worthy to be praised: so shall I be saved from mine enemies. The sorrows of death compassed me, and the floods of ungodly men made me afraid. The sorrows of hell compassed me about: the snares of death prevented me. In my distress I called upon the LORD, and cried unto my God: he heard my voice out of his temple, and my cry came before him, even into his ears. Then the earth shook and trembled; the foundations also of the hills moved and were shaken, because he was wroth. There went up a smoke out of his nostrils, and fire out of his mouth devoured: coals were kindled by it. He bowed the heavens also, and came down: and darkness was under his feet. And he rode upon a cherub, and did fly: yea, he did fly upon the wings of the wind. He made darkness his secret place; his pavilion round about him were dark waters and thick clouds of the skies. At the brightness that was before him his thick clouds passed, hail stones and coals of fire. The LORD also thundered in the heavens, and the Highest gave his voice; hail stones and coals of fire. Yea, he sent out his arrows, and scattered them; and he shot out lightnings, and discomfited them. Then the channels of waters were seen, and the foundations of the world were discovered at thy rebuke, O LORD, at the blast of the breath of thy nostrils. He sent from above, he took me, he drew me out of many waters. He delivered me from my strong enemy, and from them which hated me: for they were too strong for me. They prevented me in the day of my calamity: but the LORD was my stay. He brought me forth also into a large place; he delivered me, because he delighted in me".

Now I've entitled this message this morning 'What I Love About The Lord', simply because it begins: 'I will love thee, O LORD', and then the Psalmist gives us a lot of reasons why we should love Him. You also find something similar to this Psalm in 2 Samuel 22, and of course the context, being a Psalm of David, is found in David's life story - particularly the many occasions where he was fleeing from an enemy or from King Saul. He never included Saul, or classed him among his 'enemies', and yet he behaved as an enemy toward David - but he had many other enemies. In this Psalm he is really expressing the that reason why he loves the Lord, and has great cause to praise the Lord is because of how the Lord has looked after him.

How do you walk intimately with God? How do you learn to really love the Lord?

In verse 1 the verb that he uses for 'love', when he says 'I will love the Lord', is very significant. It is one of the most tender of words for 'affection', and in fact this word is nowhere else used in the Scriptures in relation to man's love toward God, it's only ever used to express the great, deep, wide, broad, infinite love that God has toward men - but here it's used referring to David's love towards the Almighty. It's actually a word that is related to the Hebrew word for 'womb', a mother's womb. Therefore, by inference, it describes the kind of love that a mother has for a baby - and that is often used as a description of the love that God has for us. Isaiah 49 verse 15: 'Can a woman forget her sucking child, that she should not have compassion on the son of her womb? yea, they may forget, yet will I not forget thee' - God's love described like the love of a mother for a child.

It's also described as the love of a father for his children, Psalm 103:13: 'Like as a father pitieth his children, so the LORD pitieth them that fear him'. It's a love in general that is used of the Lord towards His chosen, His people, whether it be Israel in the Old Testament, or the church in the New - but the remarkable thing about this Psalm is that now this word is uniquely being used to express David's love back to God, and the love that, ultimately, every child of God should reciprocate towards our Father. Do you have that love today?

Well, I want to share with you from David's heart and my own, what I love about the Lord - but do you love him? Charles Simeon was the rector of Holy Trinity Church in Cambridge for 54 years from 1782-1836. He had a profound effect upon Cambridge University in his time there, and among those who were converted and influenced through his ministry was Henry Martyn, the pioneer missionary to India. Often on occasion students in the University were invited back to the rectory for tea, where they were encouraged to ask Simeon some questions regarding spiritual truth. One question that was asked on one of these occasions is this: 'How do you maintain a close walk with God, Mr Simeon?'. What would your answer to that be? How do you maintain a close walk with God? This was his reply, and I'm quoting: 'By constantly meditating on the goodness of God', then he went on, 'and our great deliverance from the punishment which our sins deserve'. He continues: 'Keeping both of these in mind, we shall find ourselves advancing on our course, we shall feel the presence of God, we shall experience His love, and we shall live in the enjoyment of His favour and in the hope of His grace'. He finishes like this: 'Meditation is the grand means of our growth in grace'.

How do you walk intimately with God? Or you could ask: how do you learn to really love the Lord? He's saying: 'By meditating', that's how we'll grow in love, 'upon the goodness of God, upon how He has delivered us from the punishment which our sins deserve'. When we do that, we will feel God's presence, we will experience His love even more, we will live in the enjoyment of His favour - meditation is the key. It is a greater appreciation of God's love and God's goodness toward us which causes us to love God all the more. Now we looked at that in some detail on Monday night, and we quoted this verse, 1 John 4:19: 'We love, because he first loved us'. The more we get a greater capacity to understand and conceive God's love toward us, we're drawn out in love more and more to Him.

If the only way to get a greater love for God is to meditate upon His love for us, time needs to be set aside to meditate on God's goodness. Do we do that?

But here's the challenge, this is one I gave on Monday night and I give it again because it's a challenge always to my heart, it's simply this: if the only way to get a greater love for God is to meditate upon His love for us, time needs to be set aside to meditate on God's goodness. Do we do that? David did it. In fact, there are many many examples in his Psalms where he sat down on some occasion with a pen and paper, and he wrote down a poem or a song because he was meditating upon God's word. Don't you think that this process of inspiration is like God using these men like robots, where they sit down and He dictates into their ear what they write. No, God works through the spirit of men, through the mind of men and the heart of men, and it is through an intimate fellowship and relationship and meditation that God's thoughts have come to David and onto the page that you have before you. That was what caused his great appreciation of God's love, and the precipitation of his love toward God.

I know it's hard to get time, you don't need to tell me about that - but it's essential. I think of how Samuel came to anoint Saul as King, and this always teaches me this lesson of the necessity of spending time with God alone and listening to His voice. You remember, after there was the whole raucous about finding Saul's father's donkeys, and really God was using that to bring him into contact with the holy man, Samuel - Samuel, when he found him, said to Saul: 'Bid the servant pass on before us, (and he passed on)', but Samuel said to Saul, 'but stand thou still a while, that I may show thee the word of God'. How many of us let the rest of life pass on, and stand still a while that we might contemplate our God? J. I. Packer said: 'Disregard the study of God, and you sentence yourself to stumble and blunder through life blindfolded'.

What a blessing when we think on Him. Here's three reasons, at least, I'll give you this morning what David could say he loved about the Lord, and what we should love about Him too. Here's the first thing: His person. Verse 2: 'The LORD is my rock, and my fortress, and my deliverer; my God, my strength, in whom I will trust; my buckler, and the horn of my salvation, and my high tower'. What a list of metaphors and descriptions of our God! 'My rock', what does that speak of? I think it speaks of stability: God, in His person, can give us stability, for He is our Rock if we're trusting in Him. 'My fortress', that speaks of a little bit more than stability, of protection. Our God can protect us physically, mentally, emotionally and spiritually. Then we find Him called 'My deliverer', and that has a sense of a Saviour, One who comes to our defence; but it's One who is external to us, outside of us, and runs to help us. Then there is 'My buckler', and if 'My deliverer' is the defence from another, a buckler was a small shield - and that, I think, speaks of defence for your own person that God has given you to use yourself - but God is our shield!

God knows what He's doing, and whilst we're in the maze of life and don't know where to turn, and don't know where to be led at times, God is on high looking down - He knows exactly how to get out of it all, and He knows where it's leading...

Then we read of the description that 'He is the horn of my salvation', David says. A horn was descriptive of strength, probably the horns of the cattle of Lebanon, and here we have this idea, this figurative language speaking of God's strength as being a horn. We can be strong in the Lord and in the power of His might. Then finally He is described as 'a high tower', and I think that communicates the idea of transcendence, that God is above us, His ways are not our ways, His thoughts are not our thoughts. God knows what He's doing, and whilst we're in the maze of life and don't know where to turn, and don't know where to be led at times, God is on high looking down - He knows exactly how to get out of it all, and He knows where it's leading.

Charles Leper, who we were hearing about on Friday evening, has a book on the Psalms which I have in my library. He likens this description to the tower of David, which it is said was an elegant building, built of marble on Mount Zion. It was literally founded upon a rock, it was a fortress, it was a place of strength and deliverance. As well as used as a high tower from which observation of the enemy could be made, and refuge from the enemy could be taken; in this tower of David was often stored the shields, and the doctors, and the weapons that the mighty warriors would use to fight the enemy in defence. What David has in mind using this as imagery is not the arm of flesh, but how God is our defence.

Another author thinks that this imagery is actually referring to specific incidents in David's own life. Listen to this: 'The first rock that is mentioned here', he says, 'was the cliff in the desert of Maon. The second, which is a different word used for 'rock', was the crag of the wild goats in the desert of Engedi, where David fled to. The third, the fortress, is the stronghold of the cave of Adullam'. Really what he is saying is that this is like a poetic account of David's years when he was hunted as an outlaw by his enemies and by Saul. Derek Kidner says: 'In the rush of metaphors, David relives his escapes and his victories'.

What's David doing? He's reminiscing. Sometimes it's not a good thing to reminisce, but when it concerns the blessings of God in our life, I think it is good. As he thinks of his history, now he's on the throne, it's all over - so often when our problems are all over and things are going well for us, we forget how God honoured us in the midst of our trials, don't we? But he reminisces, and he contemplates how God is stronger than anything, that God is transcendent; therefore God was able, in the midst of these adverse persecuting circumstances, to lift David above all of those circumstances.

It's described in another Psalm, 34:19: 'Many are the afflictions of the righteous: but the LORD delivereth him out of them all'. Is that not a reason to love God? Is it not? But you see, you can only love Him if you've got to know Him; and you can only get to know Him, in a sense, if you've experienced His person in the very elements. Daniel says: 'The people that do know their God shall be strong, and shall do exploits' - but you've got to know God, you've got to understand something about His person. G. Campbell Morgan said: 'A man's concept of God creates his attitude towards the hour in which he lives'. How are you coping at this moment? Your attitude to God will dramatically improve your aspect upon life. A knowledge of God, or the lack of it, affects your life as well as your love to the Almighty.

A knowledge of God, or the lack of it, affects your life as well as your love to the Almighty

Arnold Prader (sp?) has said: 'An imperfect knowledge of God is like the tail feathers of a peacock: highly ornamental, but not much use in high wind'. Is that what our knowledge of God is? Maybe we do know the doctrines, we know all these descriptions, we perhaps could quote this Psalm - but is it all ornamental for others to see, and for us to think we know? But when the high winds of the storms of life come, we don't actually take refuge in the person and the attributes of our God! Now the great need for people today, I believe, is to know God by something more than hearsay. As far as you're concerned this morning, this is hearsay. What you're hearing is second-hand from me, but until you prove the person of God by faith in your life, that's all it is. It's when you prove Him like this that you begin to love Him even more.

When was the last time you proved God's good person in your life? Think of a time when you have, and I'll guarantee you that whatever that was, you love Him for that - don't you? - that expression of love toward you. John Henry Jowett, the great preacher, said: 'Get me a man who is restfully intimate with the Lord, and you have a man whose force is tremendous'. I would like to change that to: 'Give me a man who is restfully intimate with the Lord, and you have a man whose love is tremendous', the love that he has for the Lord. But then when we come to the New Testament, how our love erupts and inflates when we see that God has not simply revealed Himself in a descriptive metaphor like in Psalm 18 throughout the whole Testament and Scriptures, but He has revealed Himself in the face of Jesus Christ. Not just in the written word, but in the living Word!

Through the ages philosophers, intellectuals, theologians have peered into the darkness - 'Who is God?'. They have listened to the stillness, they have looked into the cold and the silent depths of space and come away with a collection of definitions of this 'something', this impersonal being they think is out there. Aristotle called it: 'The unmoved mover'. Spencer called Him: 'Eternal energy'. Huxley said: 'He is the unknown absolute'. Liberal theology speaks of Him as 'the ultimate reality, and the ground of being', while others talk about God as 'first principles, cosmic organism, life force, sum total of accumulated idealism'. Even the Athenians in the book of Acts worshipped Him as 'the unknown God' - but we know who He is! He is God the Father, and we worship Him, and our fellowship is with Him and with His Son Jesus Christ. We have His revelation in the Holy Scriptures, and we can say this morning: 'We know the grace of our Lord Jesus Christ, that, though he was rich, yet for your sakes he became poor, that we through his poverty might be rich'. He has declared Himself in the Lord Jesus: 'He that spared not his own Son, but delivered him up for us all, how shall he not with him also freely give us all things?'.

This is the God we know! We're not left to just descriptive metaphors in Psalm 18, we have Christ!

This is the God we know! We're not left to just descriptive metaphors in Psalm 18, we have Christ! Can we not say this morning: 'I love the Lord because of His person, and because of His person chiefly, perfectly, and completely revealed in our blessed Lord Jesus Christ, our Saviour, Master, Redeemer and Friend'. I love the Lord because of His person - but do you know something? David leads us on to see how we love God because of His answers to our prayers. In verses 3 and 6: 'I will call upon the LORD, who is worthy to be praised: so shall I be saved from mine enemies', verse 6, 'In my distress I called upon the LORD, and cried unto my God: he heard my voice out of his temple, and my cry came before him, even into his ears'.

Verse 3 is an interesting verse with a marked phrase: 'I will call upon the LORD, who is worthy to be praised'. We call upon a God in prayer who is worthy of praise. His names, His attributes that we've been thinking about, they encourage us to pray in faith. Is that not true? We're not bowing down to gods of stone, and silver, and wood, and studded with precious stones; hands that can't move, feet that can't walk, mouth that can't speak, eyes that can't see, ears that can't hear. We worship the living God! But what David, by inference, is saying is that there's no point in having this God as your God, and having a fortress like this, if you don't shelter and run to it for safety. That's a brilliant test of whether you really love the Lord, and whether you really know the Lord: it's how much you pray to the Lord, how much you depend on the Lord. C. H. Spurgeon said: 'The best material out of which to make songs of praise are old prayers' - prayers that God has answered! You can look back to them and raise your Ebenezer, and say: 'Hitherto hath the Lord led us!'. Build up a memorial of praise to the answers to prayer that you've had, because you've trusted in your God, the God who you know is the Living God.

David describes how he had answered prayer in persecution: 'so shall I be saved from mine enemies...the floods of ungodly men made me afraid'. Are you in persecution this morning? Your God can deliver you even in the midst of it. He mightn't deliver you from it, but He could deliver you from actually going through it: 'In the presence of mine enemies: thou anointest my head with oil'. He said 'In sorrow the Lord answered my prayers': 'The sorrows of death compassed me'. Indeed, on one occasion, David said in his life's biography: 'There is but a step between me and death'. Is that where you are? Because of some news you've just been given, or because of troublesome experiences you're going through, you're despairing of life itself. David testified that 'When the sorrows of death took hold on me, the Lord heard me'!

The actual description here of being in distress is the sense, the word is, of being 'hemmed in on every side', it is being caught in a trap, being bound by cords

Even in torment David could say: 'The sorrows of hell compassed me about: the snares of death prevented me'. Some people use this as a description, and I know it's not perfectly accurate - but if you're not going through what they're going through, I don't think you have any reason to critique it - they say: 'I'm going through hell!'. Now, I know that's not possible in a literal sense, but sometimes that's the way it feels: torment - but even in the midst of that, David says: 'My Lord heard me'. In distress, are you going through distress? David says: 'In distress I called upon the LORD'. Now the actual description here of being in distress is the sense, the word is, of being 'hemmed in on every side', it is being caught in a trap, being bound by cords. He even uses descriptive language about being thrown into deep waters and left to drown.

Now the more you read this Psalm, the more you realise that this Psalm appears to have a deeper meaning than what relates to David's life alone. Many of the Psalms, of course, are prophetic; and I believe that this Psalm could be applied, apart from references to sin and confession, to our Lord Jesus Christ. Indeed, there are two quotations of this Psalm in the New Testament, and they refer to the Lord Himself. Who ever knew the sorrows of death and the torments of hell like our Lord Jesus Christ when He was nailed to that cross and tasted death for every man? Is it not written: 'Was ever sorrow like unto my sorrow?'.

In verses 6 and 7 we read how he called upon the Lord, and the Lord heard out of His temple 'and my cry came before him, even into his ears. Then the earth shook and trembled; the foundations also of the hills moved and were shaken, because God was angry'. Was there ever such an exhibition of God's wrath as Calvary, where God's anger was manifested on His own Son? The thunderbolts came thick and fast, the earth shook literally with an earthquake, the heavens were bowed and darkness covered the earth - and in that hour, how many times did the Lord Jesus Christ call upon God? 'In my distress', Christ even could say, 'I called upon the LORD, and He heard me'.

Isn't it wonderful that we don't just have the words of the Psalmist here, but we have the words of the Lord Jesus Christ Himself, prophetically - and that means that we have a Great High Priest who is touched with the feelings of our infirmities, because He was tested in all points as we are, sin apart. In verse 6 he says: 'I called upon the LORD, and cried unto my God', David called upon the LORD, the Lord Jesus Christ on the cross called upon the LORD. Can I ask you: who do you cry to when you're in distress? Who do we run to? It says of the Lord Jesus Christ that 'in the days of his flesh, having offered up prayers and supplications with strong crying and tears unto him', God, 'that was able to save him from death, having been heard for his godly fear'. He, the Lord Jesus, cried unto the LORD, poured out His heart, the distresses and those things in His mind and heart that none of us can never know - but He brought them to God. The Bible says, praise His name, the Lord Jesus Christ was heard - and that means this: if you're in Him by faith, and you do the same, you'll be heard as well in the courts of glory.

Do you know what the truth is for most Christians today? Prayer is the last resort, it's the last thing that we do!

But do you know what the truth is for most Christians today? Prayer is the last resort, it's the last thing that we do. It's got like saying grace - maybe saying grace in your house, if you do it, isn't like this, it's just like putting the salt on before the meal - it's habit. That's what prayer is for a lot of us. Some would do, if we do it in the morning or we do it at night, but when a problem comes along - if you suggest it even, praying about it, some Christians would look at you and say: 'Wise up! We don't need to pray now, we need to act'. What David is saying here is that 'When I was in distress and I called upon the LORD, the LORD heard me. It wasn't a last resort, and because He heard me I love Him all the more'. If we only understood how the Lord can answer prayer, I'll tell you: we would do an awful lot more!

Maybe that's a proof of how little answers to prayer we're getting, because of the little prayer that there is about. Now I know that Christians are maybe thinking in their minds and their hearts - and they wouldn't articulate that, because it would be a shame to do that, little do you know it's a shame to think it anyway - but maybe you're thinking: 'What difference does it make? What difference, really, does prayer make?'. David says it makes a difference whether you're an agnostic or atheist Christian when it comes to prayer. You might say: 'We do believe that prayer is answered', but deep down in your heart you don't really hold onto that. I tell you: do you see when you start seeing God answer prayers in a miraculous way? That is the greatest incentive and encouragement to pray more - and God does it! 'To him that ordereth his conversation aright, will I show the salvation of God'. You can't live as you like now, and pray and expect everything to just happen. We would love Him more when we saw Him answer more.

What I love about the Lord: His person, answers to prayer, and then thirdly - verses 7 to the end where we read, verse 20 - God's presence. What I love about the Lord, David says, is His presence. Now, when you read this graphic account, the poetic account of the deliverances that David apparently experienced, and then you go to the books of 1 and 2 Samuel and try to relate them to David's biographical story, you really should be left thinking: 'Well, none of these things ever happened'. If you read verse 7 on, about the hills trembling and being moved, about God smoking out of His nostrils, the heavens bowing down - if you take those verses literally, they never happened! When in David's life did the Lord come swooping down like a cherub is described doing in verse 10, or when did God answer him through a storm as we read of in verse 12? He didn't! But the whole point is the very contrast, now watch this please: the contrast of what was actually experienced in David's life, and what God says He was doing in David's experience.

It was the Lord who was his rock, the Lord was his fortress, not those caves and crevices! God's glory was behind the veil of circumstance in David's life!

What am I talking about? However David was delivered in its specifics, in a sense, is irrelevant - because, as David's sitting here meditating, and looks back over his life, and these instances when he was running like a partridge round the wilderness of Palestine, he saw that the hand of God was in it all! That's the point! He didn't see it with his eyes, he saw with his heart - for we walk by faith, not by sight. David might have taken refuge in the cave of Adullam, he might have went to the rocks of the wild goats, he might have ran to the cliffs of Maon - but David's point is this: that in hindsight, as he looks back on it all, he sees that the Lord was in everything, and it was the Lord who was his rock, the Lord was his fortress, not those caves and crevices! God's glory was behind the veil of circumstance in David's life! That is profound.

Have you grasped that? What is your veil of circumstance, a horizon you can't see beyond? God is in it. William Cowper was a troubled soul. He wrote many of our hymns, such as: 'There is a fountain filled with blood'. He was so troubled with deep depression on occasions, that several times he attempted to take his own life. After one such time was thwarted, by the providence of God we believe, he went back to the place where he was staying and took a pen and paper and wrote the hymn: 'God moves in mysterious ways, His wonders to perform'. Speaking of God's providence behind the veil of circumstance, Cowper said: 'He plants His footsteps in the sea and rides upon the storm' - that is exactly what David is saying. 'I'm experiencing a storm, I'm experiencing a sea that is overwhelming me', David says, 'God was there, He was my refuge, He was my strength, He was my strong tower'.

This is what is being taught here, and it's right throughout the Bible: by hindsight we learn to get foresight in the things of God. Can you tell me, no matter how discouraged you are as a Christian, just now as you look over your life as a child of God, tell me that you don't have times that when you were going through the hardest, roughest, darkest valley, that now you can see the Lord's hand in it all? Maybe not all the circumstances, but there's bound to be some. David is saying that even when life is the most humdrum - and don't you think there was anything glamorous about running around like a wee lad in the wilderness of Judaea, there wasn't anything glamorous about sleeping in a cave all night with rats and all sorts of other wildlife. It didn't seem supernaturally spectacular, but David is saying to us: what is the humdrum circumstance of your life? Is it the dishes? Is it the housework? Is it being a housewife? What is it? Is it tending a sick relative? Well, in the midst of those things God is there! That's what he's saying. In the midst of crisis and distress, God is there!

You might say: 'I don't know His presence'. This is a wee bit like prayer: one of our problems is how we perceive God's presence, or how we do not perceive it. This is the very point that David is getting at. He hadn't experienced lightning and thunder, and mountains moving and all that - but he had experienced God's providence in his life, and he could detect the presence of the Almighty in that! When Winston Churchill lost the election in 1946, his wife said to him: 'It might be a blessing in disguise', and Churchill replied 'If it's a blessing, it's well disguised'. That's the way we feel sometimes, isn't it? 'How could that be a blessing?', but we must recognise that God's providence is God acting, at times, anonymously; God moving in the shadows.

He hadn't experienced lightning and thunder, and mountains moving and all that - but he had experienced God's providence in his life, and he could detect the presence of the Almighty in that!

A young Jewish girl in Warsaw in one of the ghettos managed to escape over the wall and hide in a cave. She died there shortly before the Allied army broke through and broke out the ghetto. Before she died, she scratched on the wall three things. The first was: 'I believe in the sun, even though it is not shining'. The second: 'I believe in love, even when feeling it or not'. The third was: 'I believe in God, even when He is silent'. Do we? You see, the key of practising the presence of God is prayer - I have no doubt about that. In verse 9: 'He bowed the heavens also, and came down: and darkness was under his feet'. Prayer is practising the presence of God; prayer brings God down, as it were; it puts God, if I can say it reverently, and you understand what I mean by this, it puts God into our circumstances, our situation, our environment, when we choose to believe God by faith in prayer. Then when God does move, and when God does intervene, unmovable obstacles are shifted and affected.

When God comes to our rescue, our enemies would need to be afraid. Verse 8: 'There went up a smoke out of his nostrils, and fire out of his mouth devoured: coals were kindled by it'. Even in life's darkest stormiest hours, His presence can be known. Verses 11 to 15, read that description of God coming down, His presence, to rescue us.

Let me ask you as I close this morning: are you in distress? That could be for a thousand reasons. Verse 6 says: 'In my distress I called upon the LORD' - that word 'distress', as I've already said, it means to be in a tight place, in a corner, to be hemmed in. But after David came to God, David found in God - verse 19 says, look at it - 'A large place'. God moved him from being hemmed in in a narrow, tightening, life-expiring situation, to being delivered into a large place. In verse 36, we never looked at it today, but he could speak of God giving him 'large steps'. Do you feel you're not making any progress where you are? God can give you large steps in the midst of it.

Oh, how David loved the Lord for His person, for the prayers He had answered, and for the presence he had experienced. The truth, perhaps, in it all is that when you've got nothing left but God - and some of you widows find yourself in that situation - you become aware that He is enough! You could be doing with a wee bit more, I know - affection and care and all the rest - but is He not enough? Do you not love Him for it?

'His grace is sufficient,
Then why need I fear,
Though the testing be hard,
And the trial severe?
He tempers each wind
That upon me doth blow,
And tenderly whispers,
Thy Father doth know.

His power is sufficient,
Then why should I quail,
Though the storm clouds hang low,
And wild is the gale?
His strength will not falter,
Whatever betide,
And safe on His bosom
He bids me to hide.

His love is sufficient,
Yea, boundless and free;
As high as the mountains,
As deep as the sea.
Ah, there will I rest
Till the darkness is o'er,
And wake in His likeness,
To dwell evermore'.

Can you say this morning: 'I will love the Lord'? Do you not love Him for who He is, for what He has done, and His presence with us? Maybe you're here this morning and you're not even converted, but you're going through the trials of life - and those trials, you have understood just now, have been ordained of God in His province to cause you to flee for refuge in the Christ who died for you. Well, you've heard God's voice, the message is the same to you: call upon the Lord, whosoever shall call upon the Lord shall be saved. But every believer in this place this morning: you need to get, like me, like I need to get, a fresh glimpse of the goodness of God - and I'll tell you, what a medicine it is to face this life and all that it throws at us.

Lord, we pray that You'll write your word permanently, indelibly, on every heart - for Christ's sake and our good we pray, Amen.

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Transcribed by:
Andrew Watkins,
Preach The Word.
May 2006
www.preachtheword.com

This sermon was delivered at The Iron Hall Assembly in Belfast, Northern Ireland, by Pastor David Legge. It was transcribed from the recording titled "What I Love About The Lord" - Transcribed by Andrew Watkins, Preach The Word.

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