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Let's come and ask the Lord really to presence Himself with us, and for the Holy Spirit, who inspired these words, to come and apply them to our lives. We want to hear from heaven, don't we? We want a message from God, and so let's come and ask Him for that personally and corporately as a gathering, that God indeed will speak to us - just pray that from your heart.

Father, we come to You in the mighty name of our Lord Jesus, who is the Word of God, and in the beginning was the Word. He is the express image of Your Person, Lord, whatever You're thinking, whatever You are saying, it is expressed perfectly in Jesus. Lord, it has always been the way, it is still the same, and it will always be so - that He is Your mind and Your heart. We pray tonight that the Holy Spirit will come and minister Christ to each of us through the written word. But, Living Word, come and be with us and reveal the Father to us we pray. We each need to hear from You, Lord, there are some of us have huge, weighty matters weighing upon us tonight in our lives. Some have important decisions to make, others have crises and struggles, difficulties, worries, anxieties. There are all sorts of things going on here in this gathering that we could never compute with our puny minds, and yet we thank You that You are all-knowing, Lord, and You are almighty, and there is nothing that is too hard for You. We pray that You will come now, and that You will meet us at the point of every need. To the glory of the Lord Jesus Christ we pray, Amen.

We might have heroes in the sporting world, or in academia, or in politics, or historical figures; but I do hope that you've got heroes of the faith, Christian heroes...

OK, verse 7 then, and we are reading through in this portion to verse 17 - Hebrews chapter 13: "Remember those who rule over you, who have spoken the word of God to you, whose faith follow, considering the outcome of their conduct. Jesus Christ is the same yesterday, today, and forever. Do not be carried about with various and strange doctrines. For it is good that the heart be established by grace, not with foods which have not profited those who have been occupied with them. We have an altar from which those who serve the tabernacle have no right to eat. For the bodies of those animals, whose blood is brought into the sanctuary by the high priest for sin, are burned outside the camp. Therefore Jesus also, that He might sanctify the people with His own blood, suffered outside the gate. Therefore let us go forth to Him, outside the camp, bearing His reproach. For here we have no continuing city, but we seek the one to come. Therefore by Him let us continually offer the sacrifice of praise to God, that is, the fruit of our lips, giving thanks to His name. But do not forget to do good and to share, for with such sacrifices God is well pleased. Obey those who rule over you, and be submissive, for they watch out for your souls, as those who must give account. Let them do so with joy and not with grief, for that would be unprofitable for you".

If you look back at chapter 12 and verse 1, I don't know how many weeks ago you considered that particular Scripture, but we read there: 'Therefore we also, since we are surrounded by so great a cloud of witnesses, let us lay aside every weight, and the sin which so easily ensnares us, and let us run with endurance the race that is set before us'. This cloud of witnesses surely, mentioned here in verse 1 of chapter 12, refers back to chapter 11 and the, what we call perhaps, 'The Hall of Fame' or 'The Hall of Faith', of these many biblical characters, heroes and heroines that are recorded for us in the biblical revelation. This cloud of witnesses that encourage us, the picture perhaps is like an amphitheatre or a stadium, and we are running the race. We are in the contest, but these historical figures, our forebears in faith, are the ones who are cheering us on, encouraging us to run the race well - this cloud of witnesses, heavenly witnesses is the implication, isn't it?

Now the writer directs us in verse 7 again, I believe, to heroes of faith, but more recent heroes if you like. Many believe that verse 7 and verse 8 - and I'd be inclined to believe - that this is a reference to leaders who are now dead, perhaps by martyrdom, but they were recent leaders for the church at this particular time and their influence goes on. This is perhaps implied in the words 'who have spoken the word of God to you'. It appears that these rulers actually led them to faith in Christ. One translation puts it like this: 'Take a close look at how their lives ended, and then follow their walk of faith, or consider the outcomes, spiritual fruit, of the way they lived'. So, in the context of these latter chapters of the Epistle to the Hebrews, we see that the writer has moved, chapter 11, from these great heroes and heroines, to err just to run the race well, considering that they encourage us to do so, and now in verse 7 of chapter 13 he refers to those who led us to Christ, those who laid a foundation for us personally in the Gospel and in our discipleship, and consider the outcome and spiritual fruit of the way they lived, and even the latter end of their lives.

We are in the contest, but these historical figures, our forebears in faith, are the ones who are cheering us on...

I want to ask you before we proceed any further: have you got heroes? Now we might have heroes in the sporting world, or in academia, or in politics, or historical figures; but I do hope that you've got heroes of the faith, Christian heroes - and I believe we need spiritual heroes. Really what the writer is saying here is: 'Remember them, if you have them, remember them'. How easy it is to forget courageous Christians from history, for instance, I think more so in this present age. I wonder how many millennial Christians actually are aware of Christian history and church history. It's not that we want to be stuck in it, far from it - God is doing a new thing, remember not the former things - and yet we're not to forget the heritage that we have, to a degree. We are to have heroes, we're to have people that we look up to. Even Paul said in 1 Corinthians 11:1: 'Imitate me, just as I also imitate Christ'. So the writer here is saying: 'Remember those who rule, or ruled over you, who spoke the word of God to you, follow their faith, consider the outcome, the spiritual fruit of the way they lived'.

I don't know whether you've picked up how we often relate to spiritual heroes of the past. We tend to celebrate them, don't we, even their deeds? Denominations or a movement might build monuments and memorials to them - but woe betide us if we really, actually live like they lived! That's the hypocrisy that we all have, but we want the fruit - don't we - that they had; I hope we do! If we want the fruit that they had, we have to live the way they lived. So the writer closes this epistle, reminding us to follow our spiritual leaders, our heroes, lest we think we can win the race alone. We are to run the race as individuals, no one can run the race for us; but our success, ironically, as individuals, is dependent on how we relate to the pack. So these spiritual leaders, these heroes are a bit like pacesetters in athletics. You know what that is, it's the athlete that runs out in front of everybody, and they're not actually part of the race as such, but they are setting the pace so that they won't go too fast too quickly etc.

Now these verses, particularly verse 7, is often used to get people in the church to listen and comply to the elders. There may well be an application there, and certainly in verse 17 that is true. But I want you to understand the context here: when your leaders are your heroes, it's not difficult to submit to their authority. I think that's at the core of what the writer is saying. It's a bit like when Paul says: 'Wives, obey your husbands in the Lord'. It's not hard for a wife to obey her husband when her husband lays down his life for his wife, as Christ did for the church - agreed? It's not just about submission, and this verse, like many of the husband-wife verses, have been abused at times just to throw weight around in the church, like men have done in a marriage. But the character of those we are to be submissive to is also emphasised here. Yes, we are to obey our godly leaders and honour them, as verse 17 says, it's explicit: 'Obey those who rule over you, and be submissive, for they watch out for your souls, as those who must give account' - but if we have godly leaders, the right pace will be set. When we are submissive to such an authority, it benefits all round. We will love the brothers and sisters, verse 1: 'Let brotherly love continue'. We will help strangers, verse 2, often entertaining angels unaware. We will also be kind to prisoners in verse 3; we will live above lust, verse 4, marriage will be pure; verses 5 and 6, we will be beyond covetousness; and then verse 9, we will not be led astray by false doctrines - when we respect and submit to our leaders, but those leaders must be godly in order for this to work.

If we have godly leaders, the right pace will be set. When we are submissive to such an authority, it benefits all round...

So the writer says: 'Remember them, don't forget them!'. It's not that we worship the saints, but we should honour them - however, we do worship Jesus. Church leaders may come and go, verse 8: 'Jesus Christ is the same yesterday, today, and forever'. Leaders will fail, but Jesus Christ is the same yesterday, today, and forever. Leaders will be inconsistent, but Jesus Christ is the same yesterday, today, and forever. Leaders will let us down, but Jesus Christ is the same yesterday, today, and forever. He remains the same forever, and that is the ultimate foundation of Christian faith and obedience, and all submission. Ultimately, as chapter 12 verse 2 says, because of this we must fix our eyes upon Jesus Christ.

Have you ever been hurt by leaders, Christian leaders? I'm not asking for an attributing of blame here or anything like that, but in reality many in the church have been wounded at some time or another, whether it's perceived or actual, by leadership. The exhortation, Hebrews 12:2 in the NIV, is 'Fix our eyes on Jesus, the pioneer and perfecter of faith', who will never let us down - He is the same yesterday, today, and forever. Is that not wonderful?

Now, what does it mean for the Lord Jesus to be the same yesterday, today, and forever? Well, it's too much for me to begin to explore here tonight, but let me give you at least four things that I think it means. First of all, it's speaking of His Person. In His Person, He's the same yesterday, today, and forever. If you go to the first chapter of Hebrews, which you must have explored some time ago, and look at verse 8 through to 12, we have a dialogue between the Father, God the Father and God the Son. Verse 8: 'But to the Son God says: 'Your throne, O God'', so there's the Father, who is God, calling the Son 'God', ''Your throne, O God, is forever and ever; a scepter of righteousness is the scepter of Your Kingdom. You have loved righteousness and hated lawlessness; therefore God, Your God, has anointed You With the oil of gladness more than Your companions'.  And: 'You, LORD, in the beginning laid the foundation of the earth, and the heavens are the work of Your hands. They will perish, but You remain; and they will all grow old like a garment; like a cloak You will fold them up, and they will be changed. But You are the same, and Your years will not fail''. That's speaking of the Lord Jesus, in His Person He remains unchanged. There is a doctrine called 'the immutability of God', which means the changelessness of God. In Malachi 3 verse 6 the Lord says: 'I am the LORD, I change not'.

So when the writer to the Hebrews says in chapter 13 verse 8 'Jesus is the same yesterday, today, and forever', it means that in His Person He doesn't change. Now, that could cause a bit of a problem for us if we are using our heads, because it's obvious that there was a measure of change, it would appear, in the Word of God, who is the Eternal Son, who became God manifest in flesh in the incarnation, He became a man. Did He not change? He went from His incarnation here on earth, having been resurrected after the cross, to ascend to heaven and glorification - and there is a different element to His form even now. I think the way to explain this is, what the writer means is: in essence, in His true nature He did not change. When He came in human flesh at the incarnation, He took upon Himself something He never had before - flesh - but He did not change in His essence in the taking of it. Even in His glorified form now, though He is still a Man, glorified, He has never changed in His essence, His Personhood. Spurgeon put it like this: 'Christ is always the same, Christ's Person never changes. Should He come on earth to visit us again, as surely He will, we should find Him the same Jesus; as loving, as approachable, as generous, and as kind'. He may not look the same, wear the same clothes, behave identically - but if He was to come to the 21st-century, He would be the same Jesus Christ in His Person.

Even in His glorified form now, though He is still a Man glorified, He has never changed in His essence, His Personhood...

I want you to see, secondly, in His power He is the same yesterday, today, and forever. Is He still El Shaddai, the Almighty God? Is He still the omnipotent One, the all-powerful? Can it still be claimed of Jesus Christ what we quoted this morning, when He said 'All power', or 'All authority has been given to Me in heaven and on earth, go and make disciples in My name'? He must be the same, do you agree? Yet Hebrews chapter 11 verse 6 says that 'He who comes to God must believe that He is, and that He is a rewarder of those who diligently seek Him'. I think the inference there in the word 'is' is not so much that we must believe that God exists - because you wouldn't come to God if you didn't believe that He existed, atheists generally don't come to God - so the sense of the word 'is' in the context is: 'You must come to God, believing that He is active, that He is able, that He is the rewarder of those who diligently seek Him'.

Do you believe that the power of God is the same today, the power of the Lord Jesus Christ is the same today as it was yesterday when He walked among men and women in Galilee and Judaea? Do you believe it? Do you believe the power of Jesus Christ is the same today as it was outpoured at Pentecost, the Spirit of Jesus among the early apostles? Do you believe that? Some people say: 'I don't see it' - maybe it's because you don't believe it? He who comes to God must believe that He is, and He is the rewarder of those who diligently seek Him.

I was ministering to somebody just in the last week or so in prayer, and they couldn't seem to get help anywhere for their particular problem. They said that one of the most helpful things they had heard preacher say in recent days was when he was preaching from the book of Genesis, in the account of creation, where it says: 'In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth' - and he explained how, listen to what he said: 'If you believe that God created the universe ex-nihilo', which means 'out of nothing', and there are various theories of how the world came into being, but 'If you believe that God spoke and the earth was, out of nothing, you can believe God is able to help you in your problem'. I thought that was good. I think churches in general are often filled with unbelieving believers. Do you understand what I mean? In theory, they would ascribe to Jesus Christ being the same as He was yesterday, but in experience and reality, practically speaking, they don't live like that, and they don't pray like that, and they don't expect like that.

Wasn't it Mark who said, quoting our Lord in chapter 16 of his Gospel, 'These signs shall follow those who believe' - I think that's believing believers - 'These signs will follow those who believe: In My name they will cast out demons; they will speak with new tongues; they will take up serpents; and if they drink anything deadly, it will by no means hurt them; they will lay hands on the sick, and they will recover'. It says in the last verse of Mark's Gospel that these signs did accompany the preaching of the apostolic word, and God worked with them 'signs following' - because Jesus Christ, who had ascended to heaven, was the same, the same Jesus!

I think churches in general are often filled with unbelieving believers. Do you understand what I mean?

So it means His Person is the same as it always was, and therefore He always will be the same; it applies to His power. Also I want you to see in this context, it speaks of purification. The purification the Lord Jesus Christ brings is the same as it was yesterday, and will be such forever. Now, you remember the context of this epistle, some of the Hebrew Christians were now returning to their old covenant ways. They were effectively giving up on Christianity and going back to Judaism, I think that's what's inferred in verse 9: 'Do not be carried about with various and strange doctrines. For it is good that the heart be established by grace, not with foods which have not profited those who have been occupied with them'. So rather than going back to law and the legalism of Judaism, the ceremonial law, the dietary laws, the cleansing laws, it is good that the heart be established by grace - I love that phraseology! Is your heart established by grace?

The law, you see, read Romans, specifically read Galatians, brings a curse with it. It's not that there's anything wrong with God's law, it is actually perfect, but we are weak through our flesh to keep it - we can't keep it - therefore it inevitably brings a curse. The word used here in verse 9 is 'it has not profited us'. Yet, by grace, verse 10, look at it, the writer says 'We have an altar' - that's amazing, because the Jews would probably have prided themselves in having the altar, having the priesthood, having the sacrifices and the ceremonies all outlined in the Old Testament according to the pattern of Moses. But the Jews, who perhaps looked down on the Christians as having left the altar, the sacrifices, and the cult, if you like, they only had a type - like a picture, a shadow. So some of these Christians with Jewish backgrounds were wanting to return to those physical certainties, when in fact they had the anti-type, they had the fulfilment that is Jesus crucified and risen, 'We have an altar'. It's an altar, look at the verse 10, 'which those who serve the tabernacle have no right to eat' - they cannot eat of it, because they do not believe in Jesus Christ. They can't enjoy the once and for all sacrifice of our Lord, yet that's what we have.

It's from our altar, the cross, that we worship God now. That's right: we worship in spirit and according to truth. Verse 15 speaks of how we worship: 'continually offering a sacrifice of praise' - isn't that incredible? 'Continually offering' - now what does that mean? Does that mean we have to 24/7 be constantly monologuing to God in praise and doxology? Of course it doesn't. But it does mean that we need to be frequent in our praises to God, it does mean that we need to have an attitude of thanksgiving and appreciation in our hearts for what happened at that altar of Calvary. It's also described as a 'sacrifice of praise', that's interesting, isn't it? I think what is inferred there is that these believers, the Jewish ones in particular, were now suffering for their profession of faith in the Messiah who the congregation of Israel considered an impostor. So they were being persecuted for naming the name of Christ, and what the writer is inferring is: if you're able to praise and worship Jesus in the midst of suffering, it will be a sacrifice. It's easy to praise the Lord to a degree while things are going well, yes, whenever the garden is rosy and when we feel blessed. But whenever we're going through the fire and the flood, the trial, the temptation, whatever it might be, to then muster our spirits (not our emotions necessarily, they may follow suit), but to then actually pull your spirit up with its bootstraps in order to utter with the fruit of your lips something that is counterintuitive to every fibre in your being, that is a sacrifice of praise.

What the writer is inferring is: if you're able to praise and worship Jesus in the midst of suffering, it will be a sacrifice...

Have you ever tried that? Some of us make the grave mistake of waiting until we feel like praising until we praise - if you do that, you will praise very seldom. It's like waiting until you feel like praying until you pray, or waiting until you feel like reading your Bible until you read your Bible, or waiting until you feel like evangelising to tell somebody about Jesus. It's an act of your will, and it is an act of the profoundest sanctity - and in the eyes of God, it is something priceless when in your sickness, when in your turmoil, when in your tragedy, when in your crisis, you choose to praise God. 'Though He slay me, yet will I trust Him' - that takes grace, doesn't it? It takes a heart established by grace.

Peter reminds us in 1 Peter 2:5: 'You also, as living stones, are being built up a spiritual house, a holy priesthood, to offer up spiritual sacrifices acceptable to God through Jesus Christ' - but it's not only continual praise to God, like there was in the Temple, a constant adoration of the Lord. I think the church needs to learn something here, even from the Old Covenant, where they continually praised the Lord - and there is a rising of a 24/7 prayer and worship and praise movement on the earth, particularly among young people, that is grasping again our New Testament priesthood. Constantly praise the Lord - but he doesn't just refer to praise, he talks about these sacrifices of worship as being good works of sharing. Do you see that in verse 16? 'But do not forget to do good and to share, for with such sacrifices God is well pleased'. I think it's referring to verse 2, hospitality, where we sometimes will be surprised, having entertained angels unaware. It also speaks of charity as well, doing good and sharing. The whole idea throughout this purification portion, if you like, where Jesus is the same yesterday, today, and forever in His priesthood, in the offering that He has given, is speaking of how there is a perpetuity to His sacrifice, to His priesthood - it never ends. Chapter 7 talks about how the Old Covenant priests were prevented from continuing by death, but now Jesus continues forever as our Great High Priest with an unchangeable, untransferable priesthood - He's the same yesterday, today, and forever. In verse 12 the image comes from the Day of Atonement: 'Therefore Jesus also, that He might sanctify the people with His own blood, suffered outside the gate', just as verse 11, 'The bodies of those animals, whose blood is brought into the sanctuary by the high priest for sin, are burned outside the camp', Jesus suffered outside the gate. The sin offering, taken outside the camp, burned completely, Leviticus 16; Jesus is our perfect sin offering. He suffered and died outside the city gate of Jerusalem, and this is our altar. This is the sacrifice, He is our Passover, He is the propitiation not only for our sins but for the sins of the whole world.

But notice the application here, it's not just that we are to rejoice in the cross (and that is worthy), but it's actually applied to the fact that we as Christians, if we're going to be true Christians and confess Christ in a world and a climate that is Antichrist, we also will have to follow Him outside the camp. That's what it's about: we will have to go out to Him, outside the camp, spiritually, to a place of reproach and rejection. You remember who he's talking to here, Jews who confessed faith in Jesus, but now were getting cold feet, wanting to renege and backtrack, go back to Judaism and effectively turn their back on the Messiah. The writer is saying: 'There is a call upon you, just as Judaism rejected Jesus, for you to follow Him outside the camp, separate yourself from dead religion and identify with His reproach'.

If we're going to be true Christians and confess Christ in a world and a climate that is Antichrist, we also will have to follow Him outside the camp...

Now, it's very easy for us to apply this, in the context, historically to Judaism and Christianity - but can I suggest to you that there is plenty of dead religion in the church and Christendom today? Now I'm not talking about specific denominations or anything of the sort, I'm talking about across the board. It is vital for us as individuals, and as groups, if we are serious about being new covenant believers, that we choose to go outside the camp with the Lord Jesus, bearing His reproach, and reject dead religion. Verse 14: 'For here we have no continuing city, but we seek the one to come'. The writer is effectively saying: 'Why stay in Jerusalem when it is not your city?'. Jerusalem, they wanted to go back to Jerusalem, the heart of their religion; and the writer is saying: 'That's the place that Jesus was taken outside of, that you need to go outside of to identify with Him and bear His reproach'. Why identify with the old covenant law when Jesus abolished the law by fulfilling it? As Galatians 4:26 says: 'But the Jerusalem above is free, which is the mother of us all'.

Now, I'm not suggesting there is no significance to the earthly city of Jerusalem, and I'm certainly not suggesting that God has finished with the Jews or Israel, and that there is no value in being one of God's people, the Jews. On the contrary, but what I am saying is: our security is not in that, even if we were of Jewish lineage, our security is in the seed of Abraham that is Christ; and the promise is to the world in Abraham, not just to the Jew. It is the Jerusalem above that we look to.

So Jesus Christ is the same yesterday, today, and forever in His Person, in His power, in His purification that is ongoing, untransferable, unchangeable, that avails for us this very evening - but also, He is the same in persecution. I've touched on this already, but these readers were looking for a way to continue as Christians while escaping persecution that would come from other Jews, but it couldn't be done. Can I say to you that, irrespective of what the current trends might be in Christian circles, you cannot avoid some form of reproach for following the Lord Jesus. Biblically speaking, there is no such a thing as painless Christianity. There certainly must be no compromise, and in our post-Christian society in which we live, it's about time we stopped accommodating the spirit of the age and go forth to Jesus outside the camp. We must ask the question: where does Jesus stand on this issue or that issue? Whatever the climate is, or the issues involved, or the confusion even within the church, we must ask: where does Jesus stand, and I will stand with Him, even though it's outside the camp! I'm with Him, whatever is coming my way, whatever persecution, whatever rejection, whatever reproach. It is the road less travelled by, it is the narrow way, but it is the only way, for it is the way that our Master trod.

Yesterday, when Jesus showed up in history, He revealed to us what God was like, is like, and ever shall be. He is the express image of His Person, the Word of God that reveals His mind and heart. Do you want to know what God is like? Look at Jesus. But isn't it wonderful to be able to say today that the Man of Galilee, the Man of Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John, is the same today. He is the one we worship, and it is His Spirit that takes the things of Christ and reveals them to us today. He comes to us today, do you believe that? He manifests Himself to us today. Two of my most favourite scriptures in all of the word of God are John 14:21 and John 14:23, Jesus said: 'He who has My commandments and keeps them, it is he who loves Me. And he who loves Me will be loved by My Father, and I will love him and manifest Myself to him'. How does He manifest Himself to us today? Verse 23: 'Jesus answered and said to him, 'If anyone loves Me, he will keep My word; and My Father will love him, and We will come to him and make Our home with him'. Wow! Jesus says: 'If you believe Me, if you obey Me whatever the cost, if you love Me, My Father will lavish His love upon you, and I will manifest Myself to you - and, in fact, We, Father and Son, will come and make Our home with you, We will come and live with you!'. That's New Testament Christianity!

Today we are not just relating to Jesus Christ as He was in history through a book, but we are personally relating to Him through His Spirit...

So today we are not just relating to Jesus Christ as He was in history through a book, but we are personally relating to Him through His Spirit, His own Spirit. We have fellowship with Him, we know Him - that's why Paul said: 'Oh that I might know Him and the power of His resurrection, and the fellowship of His suffering, being made conformable to His image'. Then there is tomorrow: because He is who He was revealed to be in history, and He is the same today with us by His Spirit, all our hopes of everlasting joy hang on the fact that He will never change. Yes? His promises are as good as His word - and, boy, is that not a comfort to you in this world of change, transition, metamorphosis, confusion? Change is about the only certainty in this world, agreed? I mean, it's staggering, it's like Mach whatever that these astronauts experience as they go out into orbit - the speed at which change is taking place in morality, in society, in the worldview, in the mindset of many people, including Christians. Henry Lyte's melancholy verse in his hymn put it well, he said:

'Swift to its close ebbs out life's little day;
Earth's joys grow dim, its glories pass away;
Change and decay in all around I see'

But isn't it wonderful to be able to sing: 'O Thou who changest not, abide with me'. What has changed for you lately? Maybe in your family, in your job, perhaps your health, or a relationship - maybe you despair as you look around you at this world? Well, to face life's changes, look to an unchanging Saviour, Jesus Christ, the same forever. Let's pray.

Why not, as we bow in the presence of God, as I said earlier relating to that person's testimony of hearing the preacher who said 'If you believe God can create everything out of nothing, can you believe that He is able to meet your problem?'. Is He sufficient? Can He move your mountain? Do you have even a mustard seed of faith in this great God? He is the same. Just like those who by the wayside of Galilee in Judaea reached out to touch Him, or cried out for Him to have mercy upon them, can you cry out to Him today? 'Lord, have mercy! Lord, help!'.

Father, I just pray for everybody gathered here tonight, and we thank You for Your Spirit at work. We thank You for the power of Your word. We thank You that You are a faithful God. We thank You, Lord, that You have expressed Your unwavering nature through the Lord Jesus Christ, like a nail fastened in a sure place - thank You, Lord. Thank You that the Lord Jesus' love never grows cold, to a degree His patience with us never runs out - when we are faithless He remains faithful, for He cannot deny Himself. Thank You, whatever our particular need is tonight, Lord Jesus, You're able to meet that need. I pray that You will come in a very, very powerful way to people here this evening and reveal Yourself to them as the eternal Christ, as the Almighty God. Lord, we receive You now by faith to speak to our mountains. Lord, I pray for those who resent authority and find it difficult to submit to leaders, even in this assembly, because they have been hurt in the past. Lord, I pray that You will heal their wounds, I pray that their heart will be established by grace to forgive those who have harmed them. I pray, Lord, that You will bless the godly leadership in this fellowship, and indeed that You will minister to them by grace to - if they haven't already become - to become the heroes to those they serve. We just want to take a moment to thank You for the heroes we have in our lives, some of them still with us, but some we must remember. Thank You, Lord, and let us consider the fruit of their conduct as we run this race, that we might make them proud, and most of all that we would give You glory. In Jesus' name we pray, Amen.

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Transcribed by:
Andrew Watkins,
Preach The Word.
February 2018
www.preachtheword.com

This sermon was delivered at Scrabo Hall in Newtownards, Northern Ireland, by David Legge. It was transcribed from the recording titled "Jesus Christ, The Same" - Transcribed by Andrew Watkins, Preach The Word.

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